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Reblogged from shimbashka  44 notes
shimbashka:

Nunchaku History
Although the certain origin of nunchaku is not known (as are most weapons in the history), it was possibly invented in China. The popular belief is that the nunchaku was originally a short flail used to thresh rice (separate the grain from the husk). However some say that this weapon was not developed from a grain flail, and was created by a martial artist looking for a way to conceal his staff from the current oppressive government so he decided to cut it into three sections. The three sectioned staff is commonly known today as the sansetsukon.
The nunchaku was derived from this, over time becoming what it is today. Still others say its development as a weapon grew out of the moratorium on edged weaponry under the Satsuma daimyo due to their restrictive policy of weapons control after invading Okinawa in the 17th century. (Some maintain that the weapon was most likely conceived and used exclusively for that end, as the configuration of actual flails and bits are unwieldy for weapons use, not to mention the fact that peasant farmers were unlikely to train for ‘improvised’ combat against professional warriors.)The modern nunchaku has been modified for its use as a weapon and would make a relatively ineffective rice flail.
The nunchaku as a weapon has surged in popularity since martial artist Bruce Lee used it in his movies in the 1970s. It is generally considered by martial artists to be a limited weapon. Complex and difficult to wield, the nunchaku lacks the range of the bo (quarterstaff) and the edged advantage of a sword or sai. It is also prone to inflicting injury on its user. Nevertheless, the nunchaku’s impressive motion in use and perceived lethality contributed to its increasing popularity, peaking in the 1980s, perhaps due to its (unfounded) association with ninjas during the 1980s ninja craze.

shimbashka:

Nunchaku History

Although the certain origin of nunchaku is not known (as are most weapons in the history), it was possibly invented in China. The popular belief is that the nunchaku was originally a short flail used to thresh rice (separate the grain from the husk). However some say that this weapon was not developed from a grain flail, and was created by a martial artist looking for a way to conceal his staff from the current oppressive government so he decided to cut it into three sections. The three sectioned staff is commonly known today as the sansetsukon.

The nunchaku was derived from this, over time becoming what it is today. Still others say its development as a weapon grew out of the moratorium on edged weaponry under the Satsuma daimyo due to their restrictive policy of weapons control after invading Okinawa in the 17th century. (Some maintain that the weapon was most likely conceived and used exclusively for that end, as the configuration of actual flails and bits are unwieldy for weapons use, not to mention the fact that peasant farmers were unlikely to train for ‘improvised’ combat against professional warriors.)The modern nunchaku has been modified for its use as a weapon and would make a relatively ineffective rice flail.

The nunchaku as a weapon has surged in popularity since martial artist Bruce Lee used it in his movies in the 1970s. It is generally considered by martial artists to be a limited weapon. Complex and difficult to wield, the nunchaku lacks the range of the bo (quarterstaff) and the edged advantage of a sword or sai. It is also prone to inflicting injury on its user. Nevertheless, the nunchaku’s impressive motion in use and perceived lethality contributed to its increasing popularity, peaking in the 1980s, perhaps due to its (unfounded) association with ninjas during the 1980s ninja craze.

Reblogged from ahistoryofwar  173 notes

ahistoryofwar:

The Kakute were rings that the kunoichi wore that were dipped in poison. The rings could be made out of metals, and tempered wood. The ninja would quietly strangle enemies with the ring stuck in their neck. It was far less messy then using a sword, and left very little evidence on how the victim died.